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  1. #1
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    Exclamation Parole Board Letters & Parole Packet / Samples

    How to Write a Letter to the Parole Board; Sample Support Letter - Associated Content
    Click On Link In Red To Get You To This Page


    Sample Inmate Self Support Letter to the Parole Board

    How to Write a Letter to the Parole Board

    Sample Parole Packet Cover (Transmittal) Letter

    How to Create a Parole Packet
    Last edited by TexasDust; 08-22-2009 at 11:27 AM.

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    Exclamation Sample Inmate Self Support Letter to the Parole Board

    Sample Inmate Self Support Letter to the Parole Board


    If you have a friend or loved one who is incarcerated, they may have been advised that it would be helpful for them to write a letter of support to the parole board. While the following sample and guidelines should not be construed as legal advice, it might assist you in helping your friend or loved one know what to write in their letter to the parole board.

    Please be aware that each state might have different guidelines regarding what the parole board looks for in a support letter (a good rule of thumb is to contact the prison where your loved one is an inmate and ask them for any guidelines they might offer). You might also consider checking the prison's website.

    If you are seeking legal advice regarding parole, a prisoner's rights, or any other legal question regarding incarceration, please contact an attorney.

    Many parole boards want the inmate's self-support letter to be written in the inmate's own handwriting, rather than typed up by someone else on the inmate's behalf. The letter should include all of inmate's information including your name, identification number, and prison address.

    The next item in the inmate's self-support letter should be the date, which should be printed in the top left corner below the inmate's information. Next, the inmate should include the address of the parole board to whom he or she is writing.

    Following is a sample self-support letter.

    October 9, 2007

    John Q. Smith
    TDCJ#01234567
    13055 FM 3522
    Abilene, Texas 79601

    Honorable Members of the Parole Board
    Texas Board of Pardons and Parole
    Amarillo Board Office
    5809 S. Western, Suite 237
    Amarillo, TX 79110

    Dear Honorable Members of the Parole Board:

    I am writing this letter to you for your consideration in approving my parole. My parole eligibility date is June 19, 2008

    I have not had any new cases and I have not lost any work time or good time. I have signed up for all required treatment programs. I have also signed up for Changes and Cognitive Intervention classes. I feel this will help me become more aware of my actions. I know what I did was wrong and I have every intention of never breaking the law again. I take full responsibility for committing Burglary of a Habitation. I have mentally put myself in my victim's shoes, and I understand what damage has been done. I would never want that to happen to me.

    My goal when I get released is to gain employment as a welder at my father-in-law's business. I will also continue my education and study to receive an Associate's Degree in business.

    I will be living with my sister and brother-in-law who will be giving me the financial and emotional help and support that I will need until I get up on my feet. My family will be able to provide me with transportation as well.

    In conclusion, I am certain that with all I have learned from my incarceration and the support I have from my family and friends I will be able to make a positive transition back into the free world, never again to return to prison.

    Thank you very much for your time and consideration for this review for my parole.

    Sincerely,

    John Q. Smith
    TDCJ#01234567

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    Exclamation Sample Inmate Self Support Letter to the Parole Board

    Date
    Full Name
    TDCJ #
    Address
    City, Texas Zip

    Honorable Members of The Parole Board
    Texas Board Of Pardons and Parole
    P. O. Box 13401
    Capital Station
    Austin, Texas 78711-3401

    Dear Honorable Members of The Parole Board,

    I am writing this support letter for your attention to my efforts towards rehabilitation in the hope of being accepted for parole. I have accumulated over 100 per cent of my time. I have not lost any good time or work time. I have completed all required regional treatment programs.
    I have learned in the intervention class through intensive study what brought me to the place I am now. I take full responsibility for the crime I committed of __________ that has brought me to this place. I am able to admit that I have a problem and I will never be able to ______________________. I believe that being incarcerated for this crime has saved my life. I know that I would not have been able to __________________ without help and the time spent in prison has been a positive experience which has given me the opportunity to learn the steps to take to never _______________. I have a greater awareness of ________ and I am prepared to do what ever it takes to continue with ___________ and succeed in my recovery.
    My goal on release from prison is to continue with my ______________and be the best husband, father and son to my family I can be. I want to be a law abiding, productive citizen and provide for my family in a way they deserve. I am very fortunate that I have a large family and friend support system in place. They all encouraged me to learn all I can about while here. They have told me that I can count on them to provide support when I need it after I am released from prison and return home.
    Prior to incarceration I had a successful business in ______________. I have transportation so getting to my job will not pose a problem.
    In conclusion, I know that with all I have learned from my incarceration and the support I have from my family and friends I will be able to make a positive transition back into the free world never to return again to prison. I thank you for your time and consideration for this review for my parole.

    Sincerely,
    Signature
    Full Name
    TDCJ#

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    Exclamation Write a Letter to Help Your Loved One Receive Parole

    Write a Letter to Help Your Loved One Receive Parole

    If you have a friend or loved one who is incarcerated, you may have been advised that it would be helpful for you to write a letter of support to the Parole Board on behalf of the inmate. And while you would like to be able to help in some way, you don't have a clue how to write a support letter to the Parole Board! The following sample and guidelines will help you write a letter on behalf of your loved one who is eligible for parole.

    Please be aware that each state might have different guidelines regarding what the Parole Board looks for in a support letter. A good rule of thumb is to contact the prison where your loved one is an inmate and ask them for any guidelines they might offer. Many prisons have this information available on their websites. Another important fact to be aware of is that this article in no manner is an attempt to offer legal advice. If you are seeking legal advice regarding parole, a prisoner's rights, or any other legal question regarding incarceration, seek advice from an attorney.

    As with any professional correspondence, your support letter should either be on letterhead (if you have Microsoft Word or another similar program you can easily create professional-looking letterhead from a template). The letterhead should include all of your contact information including your name, address, phone number(s) and email address if applicable.

    The next item in your support letter should be the date, which should be typed in the top left corner below your letterhead. Include an address block with the information of the inmate you are writing regarding. Next, include the address of the Parole Board to whom you are writing.

    If you know a specific name of someone on the prison's Parole Board, you may address them. Otherwise, begin your support letter with "Dear Honorable Members of the Parole Board" followed by a colon (. In your first paragraph, include your name, age, occupation (if you have been employed in the same field for some time, note that in your first paragraph) and relationship with the inmate.

    In your second paragraph, describe why you believe the inmate in your opinion deserves the chance for Parole. Tell about improvements the inmate has made since being incarcerated such as education and treatment programs. Discuss their positive attitude and feelings of responsibility and remorse.

    Finish your support letter by telling the Parole Board how you will support the inmate once they are granted Parole. Your support might be financial, such as a place to live, use of a vehicle, or help finding job offers. Your support of the paroled inmate can also be emotional such as accountability, advice and encouragement.

    Once you have completed your support letter, sign it and make copies. Send the original to the Parole Board that oversees the prison where your loved one is incarcerated. Send a copy to your loved one, and keep one to use in a Parole Packet.

    Here is a sample Parole Board support letter. Again, this is only an example and does not qualify as legal advice.

    PRINT ON PERSONAL LETTERHEAD

    Date

    In regards to: John Q. Inmate
    DOC#0123456789
    123 Jailhouse Lane
    Prison City, Any State 12345

    Honorable Members of the Parole Board
    Any State Board of Pardons and Parole
    555 Parole Board Avenue
    PB City, Any State 12345

    Dear Honorable Members of the Parole Board:

    My name is Sue Friendly. I am 34 years old and have been a Librarian for the Little City Library for 15 years. I am the sister of John Q. Inmate DOC#0123456789.

    Since being incarcerated, John has completed his G.E.D. and gone on to start college courses in Information Technology. He has graduated with honors from Behavioral Health courses, and always has a positive attitude when we visit or talk on the phone. He takes full responsibility for the actions that led to his incarceration, and shows considerable remorse.

    My husband and I are more than willing to provide John with every aspect of support, guidance, accountability and love. The job market in Little City is booming. My husband can offer him direct employment at the carrot canning factory upon John being granted parole. We also have an extra car that he can use until he has saved enough to purchase his own vehicle.

    I believe beyond a doubt that given the opportunity of parole, John will come home and make us all proud. Thank you for your time and attention.

    Sincerely,

    Susan B. Friendly

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    Exclamation Sample Parole Packet Cover (Transmittal) Letter

    Sample Parole Packet Cover (Transmittal) Letter

    If you have a friend or loved one who is incarcerated, you may be considering making and sending a parole packet to the parole board on his or her behalf. This can be helpful for an inmate who will be going before his or her parole board. A parole packet can help the parole board determine whether or not a prison inmate should be granted parole. The parole packet will show the parole board what kind of support the inmate will have if he or she is granted parole. This can include financial support, physical support, emotional support and spiritual support.

    One item that you might decide to include in your parole packet is a cover letter. The cover letter, also known as a transmittal letter, describes what you are sending to the parole board. It also includes important information for the parole board, including who is sending the packet, the name and identification number of the inmate that the parole packet is in reference to, as well as when the packet was sent. Finally, since you most definitely should keep an exact duplicate of your parole packet, the cover letter will provide you with proof of when and where your parole packet was sent.

    Following is a sample of a parole packet cover, or transmittal, letter. This letter is only an example and is in no way, shape or form intended to be considered legal advice. If you require legal advice on making a parole packet, please contact an attorney.

    Mrs. Susan Jones
    987 East Home Avenue
    Another City, State 00011

    January 12, 2008

    Honorable Parole Board Member
    123 Parole Street, Suite 456
    Anytown, Any State 01234

    Dear Honorable Parole Board Member:

    Following please find the Spring 2008 parole packet, created on behalf of John Q. Smith, TDCJ# 01234567.

    Mr. Smith's Parole Board hearing is scheduled for June, 2008. I ask that you would kindly read the following parole packet and take these documents into consideration when determining your decision on whether to grant Mr. Smith parole.

    Thank you very much for your time and attention.

    Sincerely,

    Susan Jones

    You can use the "Letter Wizard" in Microsoft Word to create your cover letter on professional letterhead. Simply click "New" from the "File" menu. Then under "Templates" in the task pane, click "On My Computer". Click on the "Letters & Faxes" tab, then click "Letter Wizard" and follow the steps provided.

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    Exclamation How to Create a Parole Packet

    How to Create a Parole Packet

    If you have a loved one who is incarcerated, you might want to consider creating a parole packet on his or her behalf, especially if you know they will be going before the parole board. A parole packet helps the parole board to understand what kind of support - financial, emotional, and spiritual - a prison inmate would have if he or she is to be granted parole.

    Most prisons or parole divisions will provide information to an inmate and his or her family about how to create a parole packet, but it can still be confusing and overwhelming. While this article is not intended in any way, shape or form to provide legal advice, the following tips will show you, step by step, how to make a parole packet.

    The first thing you will need for your parole packet is a report or presentation cover. Basically, this is a binder with a plastic or chipboard back and a clear plastic front, as well as some means of containing your parole packet, such as prong fasteners for punched holes. These covers can be purchased at most office supply stores, as well as online retailers such as Staples.

    The next item you will need for your parole packet is a cover page. The cover page will provide a professional appearance for your parole packet, as well as simple, basic information regarding the inmate. You can easily create a cover page using Microsoft Word. Simply type "cover" into Word's search box and click go. Download the cover you like best. You can also find some very nice templates here. Once you have downloaded a report cover template, type some basic information into it regarding the inmate for whom you are creating the parole packet. The cover page should list the inmate's name, his or her identification number, and the words "Parole Packet" along with a date or season and year. Once you have created and printed your cover page, it will be the first page in the report cover.
    The next item to create for your parole packet is a cover, or transmittal, letter. A cover letter is a brief letter describing what is being sent as well as the purpose for sending it. It informs the recipient who is responsible for sending the parole packet, and gives you permanent record of when and where you sent the parole packet. Use a "professional letter" template in Microsoft Word, if you have access to it. To see a sample cover letter for your parole packet, click here. When you have created and printed your cover letter, put it behind the cover page in your parole packet report cover.

    The next document you will want to create for your parole packet is a table of contents or index. This will list, in order, the documents included in your parole packet. The index or table of contents is very basic. Include the inmate's name, identification number, prison address and a list of your enclosed documents with page numbers. You will need to wait until your other documents are completed and arranged before you print your table of contents or index, since you might not know which page of the parole packet each document will be until you are finished. Basically, here is what the index or table of contents will look like (again, this is only an example):

    John Q. Smith
    TDCJ#01234567
    13055 FM 3522
    Abilene, Texas 79601

    INDEX:
    PAROLE POINTS - PAGE 2
    OUTLINE - PAGE 3
    LETTER TO THE PAROLE BOARD - PAGE 4
    SUPPORT LETTERS - PAGES 5-7
    PHOTO ALBUM - PAGE 8

    The next two documents to include in your parole packet might be the Parole Guidelines Self-Assessment and the inmate's current time sheet. If these documents are applicable they will be provided to the inmate, who should send them on to you to help in making the parole packet.

    The next document in your parole packet should be a copy of the inmate's self-support letter to the parole board. You can find an example by clicking here. Next, include copies of all other support letters written to the parole board on the inmate's behalf. An example is found by clicking here.

    It is helpful to include a page or two of photos. These should be tasteful photos, showing the inmate's family and friends, the home where he or she will live upon being granted parole, as well as pictures of the inmate in street clothes. This will help the parole board to view your loved one as a "real person" and not simply a prisoner. You can create a nice looking photo page using Microsoft Publisher or a photo software program.

    Some other documents you might wish to include in the parole packet include: a letter from a potential employer; the inmate's résumé; and awards and accomplishments received by the inmate (prior to and/or during his or her incarceration). With your help and support, your inmate will be able to go before a parole board that has much more detailed information about who he or she really is.
    Last edited by TexasDust; 01-14-2010 at 11:05 AM.

 

 
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