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    Exclamation How to Write a Parole Support Letter

    Parole Support Letters:

    The following information, taken from Parole Board guidelines has been published once a year for five years, to benefit family and friends of inmates who write letters to the Board of Pardons and Paroles.

    Prisoners are encouraged by the Board of Pardons and Paroles to provide evidence of support for their release on parole. One way to do this is through letters supporting a Prisoners release. The information below is provided for Prisoners and family members who have questions about such letters.



    SUPPORT LETTERS FOR THE PAROLE FILE

    There are no rules for support letters. These are only guidelines and suggestions. You must use what fits your own special situation. Don't be afraid to ask people to write letters. Many people care and want to help. Your request for help may give them a better understanding of the correctional process.


    WHAT IS A LETTER OF SUPPORT?

    Letters of support are evidence that the offender will have a network of friends and family to help when he or she is released.


    They show:

    1. Somebody know the prisoner and cares.
    2. The prisoner has free world input while in prison.
    3. Someone will help when he/she gets out.
    4. The good side of the prisoner and thus help balance
    the bad side which appears in his or her criminal record.


    WHO WRITES SUPPORT LETTERS?

    1. You, family members, close friends and loved ones.
    2. Relatives, aunts, uncles, and grandparents.
    3. Respected members of the community, such as
    businessmen.
    4. Prospective employers, school teachers,religious teachers,
    students, counselors, etc.
    5. The Prisoner's Corrections Counselor/Supervisor or other
    people who have known him/her while in prison, e.g.
    chaplain,counselor, teacher,volunteers from the community.
    If you can't find anyone who knows the prisoner, you may
    ask for letters from people who know you and state that
    your support will be of value during the offender's re-
    adjustment to the community.
    Also, people can write offering their support for the prisoner
    based on their position in the community (such as a
    minister in your church.)


    HOW MANY SUPPORT LETTERS?

    At the time of the parole interview, three to ten support letters should be enough. Keep sending support letters regularly, not just at the parole interview date. This shows consistency and active support and lets the Parole Board know that you'll stick by the prisoner after release.

    WHAT TO SAY?

    There are several general areas of information to be included in these letters.

    1. State your name, age and occupation. If you have been on
    the current job for a number of years, state the number of
    years you have been similarly employed.

    2. State your relationship with the prisoner and the length you
    have known him or her.

    3. Your belief that, despite his/her mistake, he/she is a good
    person and the reason you feel this way.

    4. Your belief that the offender will be a useful and law abiding
    citizen if given the opportunity. You may describe
    improvements in the prisoner's attitude, behavior, or efforts
    he/she has made to improve himself/herself. If you will
    provide housing, give the address and a phone number if
    you have one. You can mention other kinds of help you can
    provide, for instance, clothing or transportation.
    Other people who will write a support letters may include
    the same type of information. If they are willing to help the
    prisoner in some way, they may include that in the letter.
    Some people are willing to help, but don't have money or a
    job to offer. They can offer to spend time with the offender
    doing something positive and worthwhile, or they can offer
    advice and encouragement. This kind of help is also
    necessary for someone just released from prison.

    NOTE: In some states, it is possible for prison employees to write letters of recommendation for parole. This is most commonly done by supervisors in a department where a prisoner works or by ranking officials on the unit who have personal knowledge of the prisoner.


    OUTLINE OF THE SUGGESTED THINGS TO COVER IN THE LETTER

    Salutation:

    (Insert address for your particular Parole Board)

    Parole Board Member
    Board of Pardons and Paroles
    P.O. Box 12345

    Any town, USA 78711


    You may address your letters to a specific person on the Parole Board, if you wish, but it is also acceptable to address your letter Dear Parole Board Member:


    FIRST PARAGRAPH

    State your name, age, and occupation. If you have been on the same job for a number of years, state the number of years you have been similarly employed.


    SECOND PARAGRAPH

    State your relationship with him/her (e.g. friend, relative, teacher, employer, co-worker, etc.)

    THIRD PARAGRAPH

    Your belief that the, despite his/her mistakes, he/she is a good person; the reason you feel this way, your belief that he/she will be a useful and a law abiding citizen given the chance. Describe any improvements in the prisoner's attitude, behavior, or efforts he/she has made to improve himself/herself (education, treatment programs).

    FOURTH PARAGRAPH

    Your willingness to be supportive and how, e.g. if you will provide housing, give address and phone number if you have one, transportation, job offer. Other people who are willing to help, but don't have money or a job to offer, can be supportive and worthwhile by offering advice and encouragement.


    Additional suggestions to go along with this information....

    1. If you or someone you know has written support letters in
    the past, make copies and include them with the parole
    packet

    2. Included in this packet should be any information and/or
    photocopies of awards or achievements your loved one may
    have achieved while incarcerated.

    3. Write out a "game plan." What does your loved one plan to
    do when he or she gets out? Be specific. Tell the board
    what job opportunities are in the area.
    4. Make a copy of the packet and send it to your loved one.
    Your loved one should write up a similar type of packet
    themselves. They can make a separate one, or include it in
    the one you make for them. He or she should present the
    packet(s) to the person who comes to interview them when
    parole time approaches. It makes a much better impression
    when they have obviously made preparations for their
    future, as well as having a source from the outside who
    cared enough to put together a presentation packet as well.


    Copied from a former parole officerÖÖ

    As a former Institutional Parole Officer, Let me tell you that the last set of guidelines here are what you should base your letters on. Letters of a personal, emotional nature are fine as well, but must be targeted along the lines set forth and with an eye toward illustrating the criteria the guidelines give. But what is best to put forth is something that doesn't sound like all the 1000's of other letters the Parole Board receives all the time.
    Her advice to keep it short and concise is also very important, as Parole Boards could just about swim in the paperwork about them. Emotive qualities should be self-evident in the letters as you discuss the points listed above. Because, even though your fiancee or husband is so dear to you, so are so many of the guys who go up for parole to their loved ones. Many rotten boys have mammas and girls who love them dearly. Most all inmates need to get home as fast as possible to help out their families. Most all inmates have families who suffer through incarceration right along with them. Many inmates have strong support networks out there (or at least people who would love to be strong support networks.) The questions to ask are: 1) What has the inmate done differently than ALL the other inmates (even sincere ones) to warrant their early return to the street? 2) How can you show that the inmate is not at risk for re-offending? (that would be things like stable employment, a lot of accountability and support in their environment, well defined goals and a delineated plan of action to accomplish those goals, etc.) 3) Has the inmate actually showed a behavioral change since the conviction? Can you prove this by a clean disciplinary record, or at least show a consistent improvement while incarcerated? 4) Is there a desire to succeed on the part of the inmate, and how the inmate represents that desire before the Board is very important. Like one Parole Board member said to me "I truly believe that 95% of guys who sit before me are speaking in complete honesty when they say that if they are paroled, they will not re-offend and will follow l the rules. And then we have to reconcile that with the fact that almost 75% will either re-offend or will willfully violate the rules of parole." When almost 3 out of 4 come back off parole, you should ask yourself "What will make it different for my loved one." The first answer most people say is "Because he/she wants it so much! They want everything to work out so bad, and they'll work so hard to make sure it works." But want too often is just that -wants. Show in your letters why he/she will actually be successful on parole! That is the key! And how you present that to a Parole Board can make all the difference.

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    Is it better to handwrite or type the letters?
    sbdalton

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    Quote Originally Posted by sbdalton View Post
    Is it better to handwrite or type the letters?
    sbdalton
    I think typing will be more professional, but thats just my opnioin

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    I type mine...But i agree rocky...

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    Quote Originally Posted by folts View Post
    I type mine...But i agree rocky...
    It looks more professional to me and doing anything for my husband , I typed it, plus made me a copy to keep. Keep it on the level of business at allll times because you know the facility already stereo type us and they might think we don't have no sense. But we do Alot of sense.....

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    YEp i typed mine and his home plan and anything i have sent them...And making 2 copies is a good idea..

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    Make sure there are more letters from outside people than family and friends.
    They always assume the family is going to plump it up.
    Also KISS is the rule of thumb when writing any of these people
    KISS-keep it simple s-----
    We Rode it Out

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    I'm new here and am a little confused. My fiance is at SAFP in Henderson, TX. We have talked a few times since he's been there but he wants me to write him as well. I need some help on addressing the letter. I know I have to put his CID number but he said I should put his pod and bunk number as well. I have the numbers but I dont know how to write out the address. Can anyone help?

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    Go to the state of Texas here on the forum and there is a Thread called SAMPLE PAROLE PACKET AND SUPPORT LETTERS INSIDE THERE YOU WILL FIND SAMPLES OF THE LTTERS AND HOW THEY ARE ADDRESSED
    Posted via Mobile Device

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    I asked the same question to the guy that prepared my man's parole package (a parole consultant), and he said he believed that parole board members always appreciated typed letters over hand-written letters. He charged me $500 to do it, and my man got early parole granted! If anyone wants his infor just e mail me

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    Thanx so much for the sample parole letter it was very informative and really helped answer some of my questions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sbdalton View Post
    Is it better to handwrite or type the letters?
    sbdalton
    sbdalton - The guy that helped my dad typed everything up, really professional. If you need to talk or would like some help, let me know. I email you his number.

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    Default My last letter to the parole board on behalf of my wife

    I know that each letter is going to be different and all, but here was my last one:

    Honorable Members of the Parole Board,

    I know that your interest doesnít lie with me, but understanding a bit of who I am and who I have become is crucial if my opinions about Michelle are to appear as anything other than hopeful fantasy and so Iíd ask that youíd consider the following:

    The most lasting lesson I have taken away from my military service is that taking a life leaves an unbearable, tortuous and indelible mark upon the psyche. Society makes a distinction between murder on the battlefield and murder on its streets but it has been my observation that the effect on the person who actually takes the life is the same. Iím certain it makes no difference to the dead and, emotional pronouncements to the contrary, I donít think it makes much difference to the loved ones of the fallen either; hero or victim, dead is gone forever.

    In my personal search for healing I have spoken to hundreds of combat veterans, members of law enforcement and inmates. On any journey, we pass mile markers along the way; a journey of healing is no different. Passing through layers of remorse, self-loathing, coping mechanisms and denial, you learn the landscape. One thing that Iíve learned is that most people donít take the whole journey; they donít want to. They find a place that offers them a balance between the pain of the past and the fear of the future and they hide. Some find the illusion of solace behind denial or self-righteousness, some hide behind patriotism or duty, but whichever hiding place they choose, I assure you that within it they find demons in that darkness worse than anything they tried to escape from. Isolation and rage is the beginning, self-hatred, alcoholism and drug addiction, insomnia, night terrors and for many, suicide.

    Such paths of attempted self-preservation become prisons. People become invested in whatever solution they have come to believe in and refuse to let go, even if letting go would lead them to true freedom. As Iíve talked with people over the years, Iíve listened to them describe old haunts of mine, patches of emotional quicksand and spiritual snake oil. Iíve watched as they sought relief in drugs, religion and zealotry of every flavor in an attempt to mask unbearable and undeniable pain. Iíve listened as theyíve explained and justified using the same words that I once did and knowing that their peace will not last, the nightmares will return; their battle is not yet won.

    I met my wife by accident, if you believe in such things. I was searching for a publisher and stumbled across a pen pal ad. As we got to know each other and our trust grew, she shared her feelings surrounding her crime, explained the evolution of those feelings, the work she did along the way and who she was now. She confirmed, through every detail, what I instinctively knew immediately; I was no longer alone on that road less traveled; she is the first to have ever described my whole journey to me in the telling of her own.

    My wife is not a public speaker. Too, she is profoundly institutionalized Ė over twenty years and her entire adult life have prepared her to smile and nod when authority tells her that two plus two equals five. She was not prepared for your insistence that she argue her case to you; she was not prepared to argue at all. That does not make her unremorseful or evil. I know the extent to which she has changed and I know the depth of her remorse and with respect, I may have been the only person in that room capable of knowing it.

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    My husband goes before the Parole board in April of this year, when is the best time to start on his packet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pxstanley View Post
    My husband goes before the Parole board in April of this year, when is the best time to start on his packet.
    Now. Three months is cutting it very close. Begin by finding out when the packet needs to be returned. The Parole Board needs time to go through it and you may find that it needs to be in 30 days before he goes in front of them giving you even less time to prepare.

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    Quote Originally Posted by allml View Post
    In my personal search for healing I have spoken to hundreds of combat veterans, members of law enforcement and inmates. On any journey, we pass mile markers along the way; a journey of healing is no different. Passing through layers of remorse, self-loathing, coping mechanisms and denial, you learn the landscape. One thing that Iíve learned is that most people donít take the whole journey; they donít want to. They find a place that offers them a balance between the pain of the past and the fear of the future and they hide. Some find the illusion of solace behind denial or self-righteousness, some hide behind patriotism or duty, but whichever hiding place they choose, I assure you that within it they find demons in that darkness worse than anything they tried to escape from. Isolation and rage is the beginning, self-hatred, alcoholism and drug addiction, insomnia, night terrors and for many, suicide.

    Such paths of attempted self-preservation become prisons. People become invested in whatever solution they have come to believe in and refuse to let go, even if letting go would lead them to true freedom. As Iíve talked with people over the years, Iíve listened to them describe old haunts of mine, patches of emotional quicksand and spiritual snake oil. Iíve watched as they sought relief in drugs, religion and zealotry of every flavor in an attempt to mask unbearable and undeniable pain. Iíve listened as theyíve explained and justified using the same words that I once did and knowing that their peace will not last, the nightmares will return; their battle is not yet won.

    Now ALL that you said above is REAL & DEEP!

    No learning it or understanding it from someones point of view or reading it out of a book. But coming from someone who Lived Through It and Got To The Other Side!

    It all stood out to me and even more so this:
    One thing that Iíve learned is that most people donít take the whole journey; they donít want to. They find a place that offers them a balance between the pain of the past and the fear of the future and they hide.

    NOW I have to say that with this quote here from you:
    Isolation and rage is the beginning, self-hatred, alcoholism and drug addiction, insomnia, night terrors and for many, suicide.

    Such paths of attempted self-preservation become prisons.

    That the ones who find them self there I would hope and pray for them that they are able to come out of it and know they can reach for something better then they knew or know at the present moment, that they wouldn't lose them self in their prison of what ever kind and rot from the inside out!

    When they cut themselves off from the rest of the world...

    Is it possible to be able to reach out to someone in that mode or frame of mind and make a difference!?

    I would think the answer is yes with Love & for some to be reached the other would have to have Understanding in the situation.

    What about the ones who are alone and unreachable Wow How Sad To Even Think Of Such Things and IF NO ONE Brought It To Our Attention It Would Be Like Out Of Sight Out Of Mind!

    So Many Locked Up In One Type Of Prison Or Another Forgotten By Others Because Of Their Misdeeds No Different From Us, Yet Most Only Did What We Have Already Done or Did What We Would Have Done IF WE Were In The Same Position!

    I Hope Michelle is Considered SOON For Release....

    And Thanks For Sharing Your Letter To The Parole Board.
    Last edited by TexasDust; 01-10-2011 at 10:13 PM.

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    Namaste, my friend,

    A lovely letter. Accurate, poetic, and sincere. It seems to end a bit abruptly, was there more to it? In considering what it might be like from the point of view of a secular Board member, I was unable to find the point, though many were made. What room was being referenced at the end? Who else was in the room? Hopefully, if it were members of the Board in attendance, they didn't consider the last line a dig at the level of awareness, true though it may be.

    Thank you for sharing. I will soon be writing the Board on behalf of my brother and reading this inspires ideas for that letter.
    May you abide in true peace.
    Om Shanti
    Kai

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    Please help. My son is in a regional jail waiting to go to prison. His parole date is 4.29.2011. (soon). My question is, where can I get a parole packet. He is in West Virginia. I want this to be ready before his parole. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

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    Question Parole Packets

    Where would I go to find out about this. My man is in Pa and has been dicked around by the board. He had homeplan submitted last year and it expired within 6 months. They seem to take their time. I would love to find out more about this. I want him home.

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    What is a parole packet? Can anyone help me with this. My son is still in jail but I want to have the home plan completed before he see's parole board. His parole eligibility date is April 30 2011.

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    Here on the forum Under Texas is a sample packet with how each page looks. Then TexasJunebug has a completed one up that she did I believe it is under prison legal help here under prison resources The name of the Thread (Post) is COMPONENTS OF MY PAROLE PACKET. I am not home and I am on my phone so I can't help more by giving you the links to the Threads.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Last edited by TexasDust; 01-21-2011 at 01:43 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by usertwin View Post
    What is a parole packet? Can anyone help me with this. My son is still in jail but I want to have the home plan completed before he see's parole board. His parole eligibility date is April 30 2011.
    Quote Originally Posted by TexasDust View Post
    Here on the forum Under Texas is a sample packet with how each page looks. Then TexasJunebug has a completed one up that she did I believe it is under prison legal help here under prison resources The name of the Thread (Post) is COMPONENTS OF MY PAROLE PACKET. I am not home and I am on my phone so I can't help more by giving you the links to the Threads.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Also on this Thread that you posted on it describes what a Parole Packet is and what it consists of.

    Ok here are the links the first one is samples of the letters you can copy and fill in your information that applies to your son.

    http://forum.jpay.com/texas-doc/1617...packet-samples

    This one is an actual one that a Member did and she posted it so other Members can see what it consists of and actually looks like completed.

    http://forum.jpay.com/prison-legal-h...parole-package

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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasDust View Post
    Parole Support Letters:

    The following information, taken from Parole Board guidelines has been published once a year for five years, to benefit family and friends of inmates who write letters to the Board of Pardons and Paroles.

    Prisoners are encouraged by the Board of Pardons and Paroles to provide evidence of support for their release on parole. One way to do this is through letters supporting a Prisoners release. The information below is provided for Prisoners and family members who have questions about such letters.



    SUPPORT LETTERS FOR THE PAROLE FILE

    There are no rules for support letters. These are only guidelines and suggestions. You must use what fits your own special situation. Don't be afraid to ask people to write letters. Many people care and want to help. Your request for help may give them a better understanding of the correctional process.


    WHAT IS A LETTER OF SUPPORT?

    Letters of support are evidence that the offender will have a network of friends and family to help when he or she is released.


    They show:

    1. Somebody know the prisoner and cares.
    2. The prisoner has free world input while in prison.
    3. Someone will help when he/she gets out.
    4. The good side of the prisoner and thus help balance
    the bad side which appears in his or her criminal record.


    WHO WRITES SUPPORT LETTERS?

    1. You, family members, close friends and loved ones.
    2. Relatives, aunts, uncles, and grandparents.
    3. Respected members of the community, such as
    businessmen.
    4. Prospective employers, school teachers,religious teachers,
    students, counselors, etc.
    5. The Prisoner's Corrections Counselor/Supervisor or other
    people who have known him/her while in prison, e.g.
    chaplain,counselor, teacher,volunteers from the community.
    If you can't find anyone who knows the prisoner, you may
    ask for letters from people who know you and state that
    your support will be of value during the offender's re-
    adjustment to the community.
    Also, people can write offering their support for the prisoner
    based on their position in the community (such as a
    minister in your church.)


    HOW MANY SUPPORT LETTERS?

    At the time of the parole interview, three to ten support letters should be enough. Keep sending support letters regularly, not just at the parole interview date. This shows consistency and active support and lets the Parole Board know that you'll stick by the prisoner after release.

    WHAT TO SAY?

    There are several general areas of information to be included in these letters.

    1. State your name, age and occupation. If you have been on
    the current job for a number of years, state the number of
    years you have been similarly employed.

    2. State your relationship with the prisoner and the length you
    have known him or her.

    3. Your belief that, despite his/her mistake, he/she is a good
    person and the reason you feel this way.

    4. Your belief that the offender will be a useful and law abiding
    citizen if given the opportunity. You may describe
    improvements in the prisoner's attitude, behavior, or efforts
    he/she has made to improve himself/herself. If you will
    provide housing, give the address and a phone number if
    you have one. You can mention other kinds of help you can
    provide, for instance, clothing or transportation.
    Other people who will write a support letters may include
    the same type of information. If they are willing to help the
    prisoner in some way, they may include that in the letter.
    Some people are willing to help, but don't have money or a
    job to offer. They can offer to spend time with the offender
    doing something positive and worthwhile, or they can offer
    advice and encouragement. This kind of help is also
    necessary for someone just released from prison.

    NOTE: In some states, it is possible for prison employees to write letters of recommendation for parole. This is most commonly done by supervisors in a department where a prisoner works or by ranking officials on the unit who have personal knowledge of the prisoner.


    OUTLINE OF THE SUGGESTED THINGS TO COVER IN THE LETTER

    Salutation:

    (Insert address for your particular Parole Board)

    Parole Board Member
    Board of Pardons and Paroles
    P.O. Box 12345

    Any town, USA 78711


    You may address your letters to a specific person on the Parole Board, if you wish, but it is also acceptable to address your letter Dear Parole Board Member:


    FIRST PARAGRAPH

    State your name, age, and occupation. If you have been on the same job for a number of years, state the number of years you have been similarly employed.


    SECOND PARAGRAPH

    State your relationship with him/her (e.g. friend, relative, teacher, employer, co-worker, etc.)

    THIRD PARAGRAPH

    Your belief that the, despite his/her mistakes, he/she is a good person; the reason you feel this way, your belief that he/she will be a useful and a law abiding citizen given the chance. Describe any improvements in the prisoner's attitude, behavior, or efforts he/she has made to improve himself/herself (education, treatment programs).

    FOURTH PARAGRAPH

    Your willingness to be supportive and how, e.g. if you will provide housing, give address and phone number if you have one, transportation, job offer. Other people who are willing to help, but don't have money or a job to offer, can be supportive and worthwhile by offering advice and encouragement.


    Additional suggestions to go along with this information....

    1. If you or someone you know has written support letters in
    the past, make copies and include them with the parole
    packet

    2. Included in this packet should be any information and/or
    photocopies of awards or achievements your loved one may
    have achieved while incarcerated.

    3. Write out a "game plan." What does your loved one plan to
    do when he or she gets out? Be specific. Tell the board
    what job opportunities are in the area.
    4. Make a copy of the packet and send it to your loved one.
    Your loved one should write up a similar type of packet
    themselves. They can make a separate one, or include it in
    the one you make for them. He or she should present the
    packet(s) to the person who comes to interview them when
    parole time approaches. It makes a much better impression
    when they have obviously made preparations for their
    future, as well as having a source from the outside who
    cared enough to put together a presentation packet as well.


    Copied from a former parole officerÖÖ

    As a former Institutional Parole Officer, Let me tell you that the last set of guidelines here are what you should base your letters on. Letters of a personal, emotional nature are fine as well, but must be targeted along the lines set forth and with an eye toward illustrating the criteria the guidelines give. But what is best to put forth is something that doesn't sound like all the 1000's of other letters the Parole Board receives all the time.
    Her advice to keep it short and concise is also very important, as Parole Boards could just about swim in the paperwork about them. Emotive qualities should be self-evident in the letters as you discuss the points listed above. Because, even though your fiancee or husband is so dear to you, so are so many of the guys who go up for parole to their loved ones. Many rotten boys have mammas and girls who love them dearly. Most all inmates need to get home as fast as possible to help out their families. Most all inmates have families who suffer through incarceration right along with them. Many inmates have strong support networks out there (or at least people who would love to be strong support networks.) The questions to ask are: 1) What has the inmate done differently than ALL the other inmates (even sincere ones) to warrant their early return to the street? 2) How can you show that the inmate is not at risk for re-offending? (that would be things like stable employment, a lot of accountability and support in their environment, well defined goals and a delineated plan of action to accomplish those goals, etc.) 3) Has the inmate actually showed a behavioral change since the conviction? Can you prove this by a clean disciplinary record, or at least show a consistent improvement while incarcerated? 4) Is there a desire to succeed on the part of the inmate, and how the inmate represents that desire before the Board is very important. Like one Parole Board member said to me "I truly believe that 95% of guys who sit before me are speaking in complete honesty when they say that if they are paroled, they will not re-offend and will follow l the rules. And then we have to reconcile that with the fact that almost 75% will either re-offend or will willfully violate the rules of parole." When almost 3 out of 4 come back off parole, you should ask yourself "What will make it different for my loved one." The first answer most people say is "Because he/she wants it so much! They want everything to work out so bad, and they'll work so hard to make sure it works." But want too often is just that -wants. Show in your letters why he/she will actually be successful on parole! That is the key! And how you present that to a Parole Board can make all the difference.
    Thank you so much for this post, I really wanted to know ALL of this! THANK YOU!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TorySchu View Post
    Thank you so much for this post, I really wanted to know ALL of this! THANK YOU!!
    Your Welcome

    I am glad that the information I posted was useful and helped someone.

    Glad I could be of assistants!
    Last edited by TexasDust; 03-19-2012 at 10:53 AM.

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    Does anyone know if support letters are kept in the inamtes file? My husband is about to try and get an appeal with the parole board and I just sent in a letter ( not for the appeal) I just had some other concerns. But when they go look into his file for the appeal the letter I sent might have some affect (in a good way I hope ) So I was just curious?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Imisshim247 View Post
    Does anyone know if support letters are kept in the inamtes file? My husband is about to try and get an appeal with the parole board and I just sent in a letter ( not for the appeal) I just had some other concerns. But when they go look into his file for the appeal the letter I sent might have some affect (in a good way I hope ) So I was just curious?
    Support letters are made a permanent file of an offender, here in Texas. I'm not sure of the other states, but I'd think that it would be similar.

    The only way to be sure, IMO, is to call the parole board that will/has handled your husband's case.

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    Thanks!! I might have to do that !!

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    my husband was at rockwall county jail, now he's gone to hutchinson state jail. how does this proceduer work? i havent heard from him in a week. i havent seen him either, im really worried about him. he's my best bud and i feel so lost without him, how can i get more info on how this works? the people at the facility are not very informative, not to mention nice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by susan_d61 View Post
    I asked the same question to the guy that prepared my man's parole package (a parole consultant), and he said he believed that parole board members always appreciated typed letters over hand-written letters. He charged me $500 to do it, and my man got early parole granted! If anyone wants his infor just e mail me
    HI< my name is Chandra Walls and I am trying to get an early release fo my son . How do i do that.

    chandra.walls@yahoo.com

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    where can i get this parole package?

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    Quote Originally Posted by angieru87 View Post
    where can i get this parole package?
    You can either pay an attorney to do one for you or you can follow the guidelines that you feel find here on the forum and make one yourself.

    It consists of letters and pages that you write up for your loved one and you put it in a file so that it can be presented to the parole board for the parole hearing.

    Since it seems like the DOC's from different states are different on the handling of the parole packet it would be in your best interest to ask the Members here for that info on how the state rules are for doing the process such as who turns it in and to who it goes to (the inmate or the parole board the time guide line for it to be turned in to the board Etc.

    or

    have your loved one ask in there so he has ALL the facts and info right.

    Good Luck

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    How do you find a Parole Consultant? What all do they do for the money you pay? Is it better to hire a Parole Lawyer for representation? I don't know if I can afford a Parole Lawyer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasDust View Post
    Parole Support Letters:

    The following information, taken from Parole Board guidelines has been published once a year for five years, to benefit family and friends of inmates who write letters to the Board of Pardons and Paroles.

    Prisoners are encouraged by the Board of Pardons and Paroles to provide evidence of support for their release on parole. One way to do this is through letters supporting a Prisoners release. The information below is provided for Prisoners and family members who have questions about such letters.



    SUPPORT LETTERS FOR THE PAROLE FILE

    There are no rules for support letters. These are only guidelines and suggestions. You must use what fits your own special situation. Don't be afraid to ask people to write letters. Many people care and want to help. Your request for help may give them a better understanding of the correctional process.


    WHAT IS A LETTER OF SUPPORT?

    Letters of support are evidence that the offender will have a network of friends and family to help when he or she is released.


    They show:

    1. Somebody know the prisoner and cares.
    2. The prisoner has free world input while in prison.
    3. Someone will help when he/she gets out.
    4. The good side of the prisoner and thus help balance
    the bad side which appears in his or her criminal record.


    WHO WRITES SUPPORT LETTERS?

    1. You, family members, close friends and loved ones.
    2. Relatives, aunts, uncles, and grandparents.
    3. Respected members of the community, such as
    businessmen.
    4. Prospective employers, school teachers,religious teachers,
    students, counselors, etc.
    5. The Prisoner's Corrections Counselor/Supervisor or other
    people who have known him/her while in prison, e.g.
    chaplain,counselor, teacher,volunteers from the community.
    If you can't find anyone who knows the prisoner, you may
    ask for letters from people who know you and state that
    your support will be of value during the offender's re-
    adjustment to the community.
    Also, people can write offering their support for the prisoner
    based on their position in the community (such as a
    minister in your church.)


    HOW MANY SUPPORT LETTERS?

    At the time of the parole interview, three to ten support letters should be enough. Keep sending support letters regularly, not just at the parole interview date. This shows consistency and active support and lets the Parole Board know that you'll stick by the prisoner after release.

    WHAT TO SAY?

    There are several general areas of information to be included in these letters.

    1. State your name, age and occupation. If you have been on
    the current job for a number of years, state the number of
    years you have been similarly employed.

    2. State your relationship with the prisoner and the length you
    have known him or her.

    3. Your belief that, despite his/her mistake, he/she is a good
    person and the reason you feel this way.

    4. Your belief that the offender will be a useful and law abiding
    citizen if given the opportunity. You may describe
    improvements in the prisoner's attitude, behavior, or efforts
    he/she has made to improve himself/herself. If you will
    provide housing, give the address and a phone number if
    you have one. You can mention other kinds of help you can
    provide, for instance, clothing or transportation.
    Other people who will write a support letters may include
    the same type of information. If they are willing to help the
    prisoner in some way, they may include that in the letter.
    Some people are willing to help, but don't have money or a
    job to offer. They can offer to spend time with the offender
    doing something positive and worthwhile, or they can offer
    advice and encouragement. This kind of help is also
    necessary for someone just released from prison.

    NOTE: In some states, it is possible for prison employees to write letters of recommendation for parole. This is most commonly done by supervisors in a department where a prisoner works or by ranking officials on the unit who have personal knowledge of the prisoner.


    OUTLINE OF THE SUGGESTED THINGS TO COVER IN THE LETTER

    Salutation:

    (Insert address for your particular Parole Board)

    Parole Board Member
    Board of Pardons and Paroles
    P.O. Box 12345

    Any town, USA 78711


    You may address your letters to a specific person on the Parole Board, if you wish, but it is also acceptable to address your letter Dear Parole Board Member:


    FIRST PARAGRAPH

    State your name, age, and occupation. If you have been on the same job for a number of years, state the number of years you have been similarly employed.


    SECOND PARAGRAPH

    State your relationship with him/her (e.g. friend, relative, teacher, employer, co-worker, etc.)

    THIRD PARAGRAPH

    Your belief that the, despite his/her mistakes, he/she is a good person; the reason you feel this way, your belief that he/she will be a useful and a law abiding citizen given the chance. Describe any improvements in the prisoner's attitude, behavior, or efforts he/she has made to improve himself/herself (education, treatment programs).

    FOURTH PARAGRAPH

    Your willingness to be supportive and how, e.g. if you will provide housing, give address and phone number if you have one, transportation, job offer. Other people who are willing to help, but don't have money or a job to offer, can be supportive and worthwhile by offering advice and encouragement.


    Additional suggestions to go along with this information....

    1. If you or someone you know has written support letters in
    the past, make copies and include them with the parole
    packet

    2. Included in this packet should be any information and/or
    photocopies of awards or achievements your loved one may
    have achieved while incarcerated.

    3. Write out a "game plan." What does your loved one plan to
    do when he or she gets out? Be specific. Tell the board
    what job opportunities are in the area.
    4. Make a copy of the packet and send it to your loved one.
    Your loved one should write up a similar type of packet
    themselves. They can make a separate one, or include it in
    the one you make for them. He or she should present the
    packet(s) to the person who comes to interview them when
    parole time approaches. It makes a much better impression
    when they have obviously made preparations for their
    future, as well as having a source from the outside who
    cared enough to put together a presentation packet as well.


    Copied from a former parole officerÖÖ

    As a former Institutional Parole Officer, Let me tell you that the last set of guidelines here are what you should base your letters on. Letters of a personal, emotional nature are fine as well, but must be targeted along the lines set forth and with an eye toward illustrating the criteria the guidelines give. But what is best to put forth is something that doesn't sound like all the 1000's of other letters the Parole Board receives all the time.
    Her advice to keep it short and concise is also very important, as Parole Boards could just about swim in the paperwork about them. Emotive qualities should be self-evident in the letters as you discuss the points listed above. Because, even though your fiancee or husband is so dear to you, so are so many of the guys who go up for parole to their loved ones. Many rotten boys have mammas and girls who love them dearly. Most all inmates need to get home as fast as possible to help out their families. Most all inmates have families who suffer through incarceration right along with them. Many inmates have strong support networks out there (or at least people who would love to be strong support networks.) The questions to ask are: 1) What has the inmate done differently than ALL the other inmates (even sincere ones) to warrant their early return to the street? 2) How can you show that the inmate is not at risk for re-offending? (that would be things like stable employment, a lot of accountability and support in their environment, well defined goals and a delineated plan of action to accomplish those goals, etc.) 3) Has the inmate actually showed a behavioral change since the conviction? Can you prove this by a clean disciplinary record, or at least show a consistent improvement while incarcerated? 4) Is there a desire to succeed on the part of the inmate, and how the inmate represents that desire before the Board is very important. Like one Parole Board member said to me "I truly believe that 95% of guys who sit before me are speaking in complete honesty when they say that if they are paroled, they will not re-offend and will follow l the rules. And then we have to reconcile that with the fact that almost 75% will either re-offend or will willfully violate the rules of parole." When almost 3 out of 4 come back off parole, you should ask yourself "What will make it different for my loved one." The first answer most people say is "Because he/she wants it so much! They want everything to work out so bad, and they'll work so hard to make sure it works." But want too often is just that -wants. Show in your letters why he/she will actually be successful on parole! That is the key! And how you present that to a Parole Board can make all the difference.
    Thank you sooo much! This is exactly what I was looking for!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jkaplans View Post
    Thank you sooo much! This is exactly what I was looking for!
    Your Welcome
    Last edited by TexasDust; 02-04-2012 at 10:37 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Imisshim247 View Post
    Does anyone know if support letters are kept in the inamtes file? My husband is about to try and get an appeal with the parole board and I just sent in a letter ( not for the appeal) I just had some other concerns. But when they go look into his file for the appeal the letter I sent might have some affect (in a good way I hope ) So I was just curious?
    yes whatever you write into the parole board they keep and put into their files.and yes depending on his situation and your concerns and his history it can make a change

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky Jackson View Post
    I think typing will be more professional, but thats just my opnioin
    no the parole wants hand written letters! bc anyone can type a letter! i know this because i asked them myself on the phone they want hand written letter!

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasDust View Post
    Parole Support Letters:

    The following information, taken from Parole Board guidelines has been published once a year for five years, to benefit family and friends of inmates who write letters to the Board of Pardons and Paroles.

    Prisoners are encouraged by the Board of Pardons and Paroles to provide evidence of support for their release on parole. One way to do this is through letters supporting a Prisoners release. The information below is provided for Prisoners and family members who have questions about such letters.



    SUPPORT LETTERS FOR THE PAROLE FILE

    There are no rules for support letters. These are only guidelines and suggestions. You must use what fits your own special situation. Don't be afraid to ask people to write letters. Many people care and want to help. Your request for help may give them a better understanding of the correctional process.


    WHAT IS A LETTER OF SUPPORT?

    Letters of support are evidence that the offender will have a network of friends and family to help when he or she is released.


    They show:

    1. Somebody know the prisoner and cares.
    2. The prisoner has free world input while in prison.
    3. Someone will help when he/she gets out.
    4. The good side of the prisoner and thus help balance
    the bad side which appears in his or her criminal record.


    WHO WRITES SUPPORT LETTERS?

    1. You, family members, close friends and loved ones.
    2. Relatives, aunts, uncles, and grandparents.
    3. Respected members of the community, such as
    businessmen.
    4. Prospective employers, school teachers,religious teachers,
    students, counselors, etc.
    5. The Prisoner's Corrections Counselor/Supervisor or other
    people who have known him/her while in prison, e.g.
    chaplain,counselor, teacher,volunteers from the community.
    If you can't find anyone who knows the prisoner, you may
    ask for letters from people who know you and state that
    your support will be of value during the offender's re-
    adjustment to the community.
    Also, people can write offering their support for the prisoner
    based on their position in the community (such as a
    minister in your church.)


    HOW MANY SUPPORT LETTERS?

    At the time of the parole interview, three to ten support letters should be enough. Keep sending support letters regularly, not just at the parole interview date. This shows consistency and active support and lets the Parole Board know that you'll stick by the prisoner after release.

    WHAT TO SAY?

    There are several general areas of information to be included in these letters.

    1. State your name, age and occupation. If you have been on
    the current job for a number of years, state the number of
    years you have been similarly employed.

    2. State your relationship with the prisoner and the length you
    have known him or her.

    3. Your belief that, despite his/her mistake, he/she is a good
    person and the reason you feel this way.

    4. Your belief that the offender will be a useful and law abiding
    citizen if given the opportunity. You may describe
    improvements in the prisoner's attitude, behavior, or efforts
    he/she has made to improve himself/herself. If you will
    provide housing, give the address and a phone number if
    you have one. You can mention other kinds of help you can
    provide, for instance, clothing or transportation.
    Other people who will write a support letters may include
    the same type of information. If they are willing to help the
    prisoner in some way, they may include that in the letter.
    Some people are willing to help, but don't have money or a
    job to offer. They can offer to spend time with the offender
    doing something positive and worthwhile, or they can offer
    advice and encouragement. This kind of help is also
    necessary for someone just released from prison.

    NOTE: In some states, it is possible for prison employees to write letters of recommendation for parole. This is most commonly done by supervisors in a department where a prisoner works or by ranking officials on the unit who have personal knowledge of the prisoner.


    OUTLINE OF THE SUGGESTED THINGS TO COVER IN THE LETTER

    Salutation:

    (Insert address for your particular Parole Board)

    Parole Board Member
    Board of Pardons and Paroles
    P.O. Box 12345

    Any town, USA 78711


    You may address your letters to a specific person on the Parole Board, if you wish, but it is also acceptable to address your letter Dear Parole Board Member:


    FIRST PARAGRAPH

    State your name, age, and occupation. If you have been on the same job for a number of years, state the number of years you have been similarly employed.


    SECOND PARAGRAPH

    State your relationship with him/her (e.g. friend, relative, teacher, employer, co-worker, etc.)

    THIRD PARAGRAPH

    Your belief that the, despite his/her mistakes, he/she is a good person; the reason you feel this way, your belief that he/she will be a useful and a law abiding citizen given the chance. Describe any improvements in the prisoner's attitude, behavior, or efforts he/she has made to improve himself/herself (education, treatment programs).

    FOURTH PARAGRAPH

    Your willingness to be supportive and how, e.g. if you will provide housing, give address and phone number if you have one, transportation, job offer. Other people who are willing to help, but don't have money or a job to offer, can be supportive and worthwhile by offering advice and encouragement.


    Additional suggestions to go along with this information....

    1. If you or someone you know has written support letters in
    the past, make copies and include them with the parole
    packet

    2. Included in this packet should be any information and/or
    photocopies of awards or achievements your loved one may
    have achieved while incarcerated.

    3. Write out a "game plan." What does your loved one plan to
    do when he or she gets out? Be specific. Tell the board
    what job opportunities are in the area.
    4. Make a copy of the packet and send it to your loved one.
    Your loved one should write up a similar type of packet
    themselves. They can make a separate one, or include it in
    the one you make for them. He or she should present the
    packet(s) to the person who comes to interview them when
    parole time approaches. It makes a much better impression
    when they have obviously made preparations for their
    future, as well as having a source from the outside who
    cared enough to put together a presentation packet as well.


    Copied from a former parole officer?€??€?

    As a former Institutional Parole Officer, Let me tell you that the last set of guidelines here are what you should base your letters on. Letters of a personal, emotional nature are fine as well, but must be targeted along the lines set forth and with an eye toward illustrating the criteria the guidelines give. But what is best to put forth is something that doesn't sound like all the 1000's of other letters the Parole Board receives all the time.
    Her advice to keep it short and concise is also very important, as Parole Boards could just about swim in the paperwork about them. Emotive qualities should be self-evident in the letters as you discuss the points listed above. Because, even though your fiancee or husband is so dear to you, so are so many of the guys who go up for parole to their loved ones. Many rotten boys have mammas and girls who love them dearly. Most all inmates need to get home as fast as possible to help out their families. Most all inmates have families who suffer through incarceration right along with them. Many inmates have strong support networks out there (or at least people who would love to be strong support networks.) The questions to ask are: 1) What has the inmate done differently than ALL the other inmates (even sincere ones) to warrant their early return to the street? 2) How can you show that the inmate is not at risk for re-offending? (that would be things like stable employment, a lot of accountability and support in their environment, well defined goals and a delineated plan of action to accomplish those goals, etc.) 3) Has the inmate actually showed a behavioral change since the conviction? Can you prove this by a clean disciplinary record, or at least show a consistent improvement while incarcerated? 4) Is there a desire to succeed on the part of the inmate, and how the inmate represents that desire before the Board is very important. Like one Parole Board member said to me "I truly believe that 95% of guys who sit before me are speaking in complete honesty when they say that if they are paroled, they will not re-offend and will follow l the rules. And then we have to reconcile that with the fact that almost 75% will either re-offend or will willfully violate the rules of parole." When almost 3 out of 4 come back off parole, you should ask yourself "What will make it different for my loved one." The first answer most people say is "Because he/she wants it so much! They want everything to work out so bad, and they'll work so hard to make sure it works." But want too often is just that -wants. Show in your letters why he/she will actually be successful on parole! That is the key! And how you present that to a Parole Board can make all the difference.
    This is pretty professional. Thanks! I prefer it to be typed.

  38. #38
    Luis Mier
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    Quote Originally Posted by usertwin View Post
    What is a parole packet? Can anyone help me with this. My son is still in jail but I want to have the home plan completed before he see's parole board. His parole eligibility date is April 30 2011.
    The first thing you will need for your parole packet is a report or presentation cover.
    The next item to create for your parole packet is a cover, or transmittal, letter.
    The next document you will want to create for your parole packet is a table of contents or index.
    The next two documents to include in your parole packet might be the Parole Guidelines Self-Assessment and the inmate's current time sheet.
    The next document in your parole packet should be a copy of the inmate's self-support letter to the parole board.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luis Mier View Post
    The first thing you will need for your parole packet is a report or presentation cover.
    The next item to create for your parole packet is a cover, or transmittal, letter.
    The next document you will want to create for your parole packet is a table of contents or index.
    The next two documents to include in your parole packet might be the Parole Guidelines Self-Assessment and the inmate's current time sheet.
    The next document in your parole packet should be a copy of the inmate's self-support letter to the parole board.
    Here is a link that may help the Members understand what you're trying to tell them

    Parole Board Letters & Parole Packet / Samples
    http://forum.jpay.com/showthread.php...Packet-Samples
    Last edited by TexasDust; 02-20-2013 at 10:26 AM.

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    I jus tfound out my husband will be seeing the parole board on April 22 2013.... That doesn't give us much time especially as slow as the mail is ...what do I need to do and how do I go about it ....

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4nwhomealone View Post
    I jus tfound out my husband will be seeing the parole board on April 22 2013.... That doesn't give us much time especially as slow as the mail is ...what do I need to do and how do I go about it ....
    Here is a link to help you with other ideas...

    http://forum.jpay.com/showthread.php...Packet-Samples
    Last edited by TexasDust; 04-06-2013 at 06:18 PM.

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    question... is it ok to ask the Lt at the county jail if she will write a support letter about my LO's behavior while he was there? i mean, would she even be allowed to do that and would it even matter? he's not been at TDCJ but a few days, so there's not much to say about his conduct there.

 

 
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