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    Default how do i write a support letter

    I am tring to write a support letter for my boyfriend who was convicted of statitory rape under the romeo and juliet laws they have in Pa, i am from Michigan so our laws are diffrent when it comes to details in a support letter. what details do i need to have?
    thank you
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    I would just under that states threads to see if there is one. If not just write it like you would for someone in mi cause it cant be that different...

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    Sample Support Letter to the Parole Board

    Below is an example of a letter to the parole board. Your letter should be short and to the point. Adjust the sample letter to fit your situation. Insert your information (your name, inmate name, etc.) in the appropriate places. If you have additional information, such as a place to for him to live or letter from someone promising a job, you should include that information in the letter. Good luck.



    State Parole Board

    Street address

    City / State /Zip



    Dear Members of the Parole Board;



    My name is (your name), and I am writing on behalf of my (son/husband/friend), (inmates name and number). I would like to ask that you grant parole to (inmate's name), when he appears before you at his parole hearing soon.

    I understand that my (son/friend/husband) made many terrible mistakes that negatively effected the lives of many people and resulted in him being sent to prison. I pray each night for my son and for anyone he may have hurt or caused harm.

    (inmate name) is a good person and very sorry for what he has done. He just wants an opportunity to prove it. During his time in prison he has taken advantage of many programs that were offered to help him become a better person.

    If he is granted parole his family is prepared to give him all the support he needs to ensure that he does not return to prison or a negative lifestyle again. Thank you for your time.



    Sincerely yours,



    (sign your name

    & Address)

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    Write a Letter to Help Your Loved One Receive Parole

    If you have a friend or loved one who is incarcerated, you may have been advised that it would be helpful for you to write a letter of support to the Parole Board on behalf of the inmate. And while you would like to be able to help in some way, you don't have a clue how to write a support letter to the Parole Board! The following sample and guidelines will help you write a letter on behalf of your loved one who is eligible for parole.

    Please be aware that each state might have different guidelines regarding what the Parole Board looks for in a support letter. A good rule of thumb is to contact the prison where your loved one is an inmate and ask them for any guidelines they might offer. Many prisons have this information available on their websites. Another important fact to be aware of is that this article in no manner is an attempt to offer legal advice. If you are seeking legal advice regarding parole, a prisoner's rights, or any other legal question regarding incarceration, seek advice from an attorney.

    As with any professional correspondence, your support letter should either be on letterhead (if you have Microsoft Word or another similar program you can easily create professional-looking letterhead from a template). The letterhead should include all of your contact information including your name, address, phone number(s) and email address if applicable.

    The next item in your support letter should be the date, which should be typed in the top left corner below your letterhead. Include an address block with the information of the inmate you are writing regarding. Next, include the address of the Parole Board to whom you are writing.

    If you know a specific name of someone on the prison's Parole Board, you may address them. Otherwise, begin your support letter with "Dear Honorable Members of the Parole Board" followed by a colon (. In your first paragraph, include your name, age, occupation (if you have been employed in the same field for some time, note that in your first paragraph) and relationship with the inmate.

    In your second paragraph, describe why you believe the inmate in your opinion deserves the chance for Parole. Tell about improvements the inmate has made since being incarcerated such as education and treatment programs. Discuss their positive attitude and feelings of responsibility and remorse.

    Finish your support letter by telling the Parole Board how you will support the inmate once they are granted Parole. Your support might be financial, such as a place to live, use of a vehicle, or help finding job offers. Your support of the paroled inmate can also be emotional such as accountability, advice and encouragement.

    Once you have completed your support letter, sign it and make copies. Send the original to the Parole Board that oversees the prison where your loved one is incarcerated. Send a copy to your loved one, and keep one to use in a Parole Packet.

    Here is a sample Parole Board support letter. Again, this is only an example and does not qualify as legal advice.

    PRINT ON PERSONAL LETTERHEAD

    Date

    In regards to: John Q. Inmate
    DOC#0123456789
    123 Jailhouse Lane
    Prison City, Any State 12345

    Honorable Members of the Parole Board
    Any State Board of Pardons and Parole
    555 Parole Board Avenue
    PB City, Any State 12345

    Dear Honorable Members of the Parole Board:

    My name is Sue Friendly. I am 34 years old and have been a Librarian for the Little City Library for 15 years. I am the sister of John Q. Inmate DOC#0123456789.

    Since being incarcerated, John has completed his G.E.D. and gone on to start college courses in Information Technology. He has graduated with honors from Behavioral Health courses, and always has a positive attitude when we visit or talk on the phone. He takes full responsibility for the actions that led to his incarceration, and shows considerable remorse.

    My husband and I are more than willing to provide John with every aspect of support, guidance, accountability and love. The job market in Little City is booming. My husband can offer him direct employment at the carrot canning factory upon John being granted parole. We also have an extra car that he can use until he has saved enough to purchase his own vehicle.

    I believe beyond a doubt that given the opportunity of parole, John will come home and make us all proud. Thank you for your time and attention.

    Sincerely,

    Susan B. Friendly

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    Parole Support Letters:

    The following information, taken from Parole Board guidelines has been published once a year for five years, to benefit family and friends of inmates who write letters to the Board of Pardons and Paroles.

    Prisoners are encouraged by the Board of Pardons and Paroles to provide evidence of support for their release on parole. One way to do this is through letters supporting a Prisoners release. The information below is provided for Prisoners and family members who have questions about such letters.



    SUPPORT LETTERS FOR THE PAROLE FILE

    There are no rules for support letters. These are only guidelines and suggestions. You must use what fits your own special situation. Don't be afraid to ask people to write letters. Many people care and want to help. Your request for help may give them a better understanding of the correctional process.


    WHAT IS A LETTER OF SUPPORT?

    Letters of support are evidence that the offender will have a network of friends and family to help when he or she is released.


    They show:

    1. Somebody know the prisoner and cares.
    2. The prisoner has free world input while in prison.
    3. Someone will help when he/she gets out.
    4. The good side of the prisoner and thus help balance
    the bad side which appears in his or her criminal record.


    WHO WRITES SUPPORT LETTERS?

    1. You, family members, close friends and loved ones.
    2. Relatives, aunts, uncles, and grandparents.
    3. Respected members of the community, such as
    businessmen.
    4. Prospective employers, school teachers,religious teachers,
    students, counselors, etc.
    5. The Prisoner's Corrections Counselor/Supervisor or other
    people who have known him/her while in prison, e.g.
    chaplain,counselor, teacher,volunteers from the community.
    If you can't find anyone who knows the prisoner, you may
    ask for letters from people who know you and state that
    your support will be of value during the offender's re-
    adjustment to the community.
    Also, people can write offering their support for the prisoner
    based on their position in the community (such as a
    minister in your church.)


    HOW MANY SUPPORT LETTERS?

    At the time of the parole interview, three to ten support letters should be enough. Keep sending support letters regularly, not just at the parole interview date. This shows consistency and active support and lets the Parole Board know that you'll stick by the prisoner after release.

    WHAT TO SAY?

    There are several general areas of information to be included in these letters.

    1. State your name, age and occupation. If you have been on
    the current job for a number of years, state the number of
    years you have been similarly employed.

    2. State your relationship with the prisoner and the length you
    have known him or her.

    3. Your belief that, despite his/her mistake, he/she is a good
    person and the reason you feel this way.

    4. Your belief that the offender will be a useful and law abiding
    citizen if given the opportunity. You may describe
    improvements in the prisoner's attitude, behavior, or efforts
    he/she has made to improve himself/herself. If you will
    provide housing, give the address and a phone number if
    you have one. You can mention other kinds of help you can
    provide, for instance, clothing or transportation.
    Other people who will write a support letters may include
    the same type of information. If they are willing to help the
    prisoner in some way, they may include that in the letter.
    Some people are willing to help, but don't have money or a
    job to offer. They can offer to spend time with the offender
    doing something positive and worthwhile, or they can offer
    advice and encouragement. This kind of help is also
    necessary for someone just released from prison.

    NOTE: In some states, it is possible for prison employees to write letters of recommendation for parole. This is most commonly done by supervisors in a department where a prisoner works or by ranking officials on the unit who have personal knowledge of the prisoner.


    OUTLINE OF THE SUGGESTED THINGS TO COVER IN THE LETTER

    Salutation:

    (Insert address for your particular Parole Board)

    Parole Board Member
    Board of Pardons and Paroles
    P.O. Box 12345

    Any town, USA 78711


    You may address your letters to a specific person on the Parole Board, if you wish, but it is also acceptable to address your letter Dear Parole Board Member:


    FIRST PARAGRAPH

    State your name, age, and occupation. If you have been on the same job for a number of years, state the number of years you have been similarly employed.


    SECOND PARAGRAPH

    State your relationship with him/her (e.g. friend, relative, teacher, employer, co-worker, etc.)

    THIRD PARAGRAPH

    Your belief that the, despite his/her mistakes, he/she is a good person; the reason you feel this way, your belief that he/she will be a useful and a law abiding citizen given the chance. Describe any improvements in the prisoner's attitude, behavior, or efforts he/she has made to improve himself/herself (education, treatment programs).

    FOURTH PARAGRAPH

    Your willingness to be supportive and how, e.g. if you will provide housing, give address and phone number if you have one, transportation, job offer. Other people who are willing to help, but don't have money or a job to offer, can be supportive and worthwhile by offering advice and encouragement.


    Additional suggestions to go along with this information....

    1. If you or someone you know has written support letters in
    the past, make copies and include them with the parole
    packet

    2. Included in this packet should be any information and/or
    photocopies of awards or achievements your loved one may
    have achieved while incarcerated.

    3. Write out a "game plan." What does your loved one plan to
    do when he or she gets out? Be specific. Tell the board
    what job opportunities are in the area.
    4. Make a copy of the packet and send it to your loved one.
    Your loved one should write up a similar type of packet
    themselves. They can make a separate one, or include it in
    the one you make for them. He or she should present the
    packet(s) to the person who comes to interview them when
    parole time approaches. It makes a much better impression
    when they have obviously made preparations for their
    future, as well as having a source from the outside who
    cared enough to put together a presentation packet as well.


    Copied from a former parole officer……

    As a former Institutional Parole Officer, Let me tell you that the last set of guidelines here are what you should base your letters on. Letters of a personal, emotional nature are fine as well, but must be targeted along the lines set forth and with an eye toward illustrating the criteria the guidelines give. But what is best to put forth is something that doesn't sound like all the 1000's of other letters the Parole Board receives all the time.
    Her advice to keep it short and concise is also very important, as Parole Boards could just about swim in the paperwork about them. Emotive qualities should be self-evident in the letters as you discuss the points listed above. Because, even though your fiancee or husband is so dear to you, so are so many of the guys who go up for parole to their loved ones. Many rotten boys have mammas and girls who love them dearly. Most all inmates need to get home as fast as possible to help out their families. Most all inmates have families who suffer through incarceration right along with them. Many inmates have strong support networks out there (or at least people who would love to be strong support networks.) The questions to ask are: 1) What has the inmate done differently than ALL the other inmates (even sincere ones) to warrant their early return to the street? 2) How can you show that the inmate is not at risk for re-offending? (that would be things like stable employment, a lot of accountability and support in their environment, well defined goals and a delineated plan of action to accomplish those goals, etc.) 3) Has the inmate actually showed a behavioral change since the conviction? Can you prove this by a clean disciplinary record, or at least show a consistent improvement while incarcerated? 4) Is there a desire to succeed on the part of the inmate, and how the inmate represents that desire before the Board is very important. Like one Parole Board member said to me "I truly believe that 95% of guys who sit before me are speaking in complete honesty when they say that if they are paroled, they will not re-offend and will follow l the rules. And then we have to reconcile that with the fact that almost 75% will either re-offend or will willfully violate the rules of parole." When almost 3 out of 4 come back off parole, you should ask yourself "What will make it different for my loved one." The first answer most people say is "Because he/she wants it so much! They want everything to work out so bad, and they'll work so hard to make sure it works." But want too often is just that -wants. Show in your letters why he/she will actually be successful on parole! That is the key! And how you present that to a Parole Board can make all the difference.

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    Any questions, lol, excellent moderator Texas
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    I would have to agree with LOVEANT on that one...I should of went to you when i had to do my support letter...

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    Thanks everyone, Very helpfull

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    Red face

    Quote Originally Posted by LoveAnt1978 View Post
    Any questions, lol, excellent moderator Texas
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Quote Originally Posted by folts View Post
    I would have to agree with LOVEANT on that one...I should of went to you when i had to do my support letter...
    Hey Thank You!

    I Try

    I barley seen This Where Was I!!!???

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    Im trying to find a few penpals to write my son he just needs someone to write him,hes not looking for money, a place to stay, he has that, he is blond, blue eyed, good looking kid,commited a non violent crime.He draws and writes poems beautifly.Info is Clifton Ashworth #934332 Bexar County jail 200 n Comal San Antonio,texas 78207

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    Hello I am starting to collect letters for my husband, he comes up for review in Oct, we cant afford a parole lawyer, so i am collecting them myself, so the info you have provided is very helpfull ty so much. they say that my letter of support will have the most impact on the boards descion. seems im his wife /victem,.I love my husband very much and he knows what he did was wrong and he wishes he could take it all back, I have supported him through it all sending him money letters everyday day telling him how much i miss and love him as i get the same letters from him aswell,. we are common law married have been for 14 years, may it will be 15 he asked me to marry him this past sep while on the phone, he says he wants it to official,. but what i need to know is can the letters of support be typed up. i have a clear binder to put them in along with pics of all of us. and pics of our home like a packett. so if someone could tell me about the typing part it wouls help allot ty, and God bless you all and your familys





    Missing My baby every min

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    Hi, I am a Philadelphia paralegal. I have a background (8 years) in criminal defense law and am now doing defense litigation. EVERY SUPPORT LETTER SHOULD BE HANDWRITTEN. I can't stress that enough. The court will frown on it because you can simply type 20 letters and have people sign them. The Judge will not want to see that. You can absolutely give a loved one a guide to show them how to set it up and let them add their own. Letters can also come from children, whether they are biological, nieces, nephews, etc. I hope this helps.

    Gatita de Manny (Tina)
    Gatita de Manny (Manny's Kitten)




    Ride or Die

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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by missingmychris View Post
    Hello I am starting to collect letters for my husband, he comes up for review in Oct, we cant afford a parole lawyer, so i am collecting them myself, so the info you have provided is very helpfull ty so much. they say that my letter of support will have the most impact on the boards descion. seems im his wife /victem,.I love my husband very much and he knows what he did was wrong and he wishes he could take it all back, I have supported him through it all sending him money letters everyday day telling him how much i miss and love him as i get the same letters from him aswell,. we are common law married have been for 14 years, may it will be 15 he asked me to marry him this past sep while on the phone, he says he wants it to official,. but what i need to know is can the letters of support be typed up. i have a clear binder to put them in along with pics of all of us. and pics of our home like a packett. so if someone could tell me about the typing part it wouls help allot ty, and God bless you all and your familys
    Yes you can type them but make sure you sign them in Pen and like the other member said make sure that all the support letters are not the same word for word...

    It makes them more personal when they are hand written BUT THE MAIN THING IS THAT THEY ARE LEGIBLE "Meaning they can be read and not where they have to struggle to make heads or tails of what is written." Because then they won't read it...
    Last edited by TexasDust; 02-13-2011 at 05:47 PM.

 

 
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