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  1. #1
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    Default 65% early release True or Rumor?

    My Boyfriend has asked me to look in to this 65% prisoner release for the state of Florida.He says he was informed from other inmates that they could be releasing inmates early for serving 65% of their sentence, it was something rick scott the governer had proposed on getting passed. Ive searched google for different websites to confirm this,and so far all i see are old news reports discussing the matter,or reports of people saying this is only a rumor that prision guards are spreading around out of meaness to inmates serving long sentences. Does anyone know if this is true or a rumor ?]

  2. #2
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    So far this is just a rumor...nothing has been passed or even proposed...This rumor has been flying around for years & years...There are some good bills in the works, for sentencing and other things, but those will impact future inmates, not the ones that are currently incarcerated. The governor's office had made a statement, when the announcement was made about closing 6 prisons, that no inmates would be released early...so until it's made into a law, I would honestly discount it as rumor...
    'To be brave is to love unconditionally without expecting anything in return.'









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    I agree...rumor.
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    Look up the following website:
    myfloridahouse.gov
    and look up the following bills,
    1334
    1390
    1798

    This is what they are talking about! You have to click on the actual bill - there are over 30 pages on information on them.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by My love since 1990! View Post
    Look up the following website:
    myfloridahouse.gov
    and look up the following bills,
    1334
    1390
    1798

    This is what they are talking about! You have to click on the actual bill - there are over 30 pages on information on them.
    ...and all these bills are for sentencing and release of future inmates, not our guys....
    'To be brave is to love unconditionally without expecting anything in return.'









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    what about michigan inmate? any early release or teather programs anyone nos about???

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    You may be talking about the Sentence Reform Bill.....if so www.FAMM.org is the website I have kept up with and they just went to DC on 6/1/11 to ask Commission to vote for RETROACTIVITY for ALL who is incarcerated...I've posted the email that was sent from FAMM member.





    Dear Ms. --

    Yesterday, the U.S. Sentencing Commission held its hearing on whether and how to make the new crack guideline retroactive. It was a jam-packed and exciting day. Here is my quick recap:

    Dozens of FAMM members attended the hearing, traveling from as far away as Indiana, Michigan, New Hampshire and North Carolina. FAMM's president, Julie Stewart, told the commissioners, that the mere presence of so many family members was more powerful than anything the witnesses could possibly say.

    But happily, witness after witness called for retroactivity, starting with the U.S. Attorney General, Eric Holder. While he also called for restrictions on who might benefit, we hope that the Commission will listen to the many, many others who testified that retroactivity should be available for everyone, not just some. Judging from the tough questions Commissioners asked the Department of Justice witness who testified with the Attorney General, we are cautiously optimistic that they will listen more to the Department's support for retroactivity and less to the Department's call for restrictions on who should be eligible for retroactivity.

    You can read Julie's written statement here and to FAMM member Natasha Darrington's excellent testimony here. Natasha did an amazing job delivering her testimony, bringing some of the commissioners and audience to tears. And when Julie asked the FAMM members with loved ones in prison to stand and be recognized, it was clear the commissioners were visibly moved. FAMM plays a powerful role in reminding policy makers who their policies impact. (Expect an email from us soon with video and pictures from the hearing.)

    Media coverage of the hearing was limited but excellent. The New York Times interviewed Julie in a piece that appears here. National Public Radio (NPR) interviewed Julie and Natasha for a segment that aired this morning on Morning Edition found here. Natasha appeared on another NPR show, Tell Me More, found here. FAMM was also quoted in an Associated Press print story and radio clip in advance of the hearing.

    Finally, I want you to know that even those of you who couldn't attend the hearing had an impact. The Commission mentioned that it had received over 34,000 letters in support of retroactivity. THANK YOU for taking the time to make your voices heard by sending in letters and signing our petition!

    So, what's next? The Commission will hold a vote on retroactivity sometime this summer. We will be back in touch to let you know what we're doing to make sure the vote comes out right.

    It was an exciting day and your support helped make it so. Thank you so much!

    Sincerely,

    Jennifer


    Jennifer Seltzer Stitt
    Federal Legislative Affairs Director

  8. #8
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    Default News on Early Release

    85% Service of Sentence Requirement: No Immediate Change Projected Due to Decrease in Prison Admissions
    Posted by admin on July 3rd, 2011
    The Restriction on Earning Gain Time Which Requires Florida Prisoners to Serve 85% of their Sentence.

    Due to the fact that for over a decade Florida officials had utilized a host of early-release programs as a means to keep the prison population in compliance with a federal court order, by 1995 there was mounting public pressure to change course. In 1995, the

    Tents Used in the 1980's to house DOC prisoners

    Florida Legislature enacted a session law entitled the “Stop Turning Out Prisoners Act” (the “STOP Act”), ch. 95-294, Laws of Fla. Therein, that statute added a provision to the incentive gain time statute, § 944.275, Florida Statutes, requiring “that all inmates, not just career criminals, with offense dates on or after October 1, 1995, must serve 85% of their sentences (i.e., no more than 15% of gain time is allowed).” Comer v. Moore, 817 So. 2d 784, 785 (Fla. 2002). Since then, every few weeks or months, Florida prisoners (and their families ) will once again struggle to determine whether their is any validity to the latest information circulating at the time in prison on the “”Inmate Rumor Mill” declaring that indeed, “the 85% statute is “going down” to 65% due to the overcrowded prison system.” Likewise, months or weeks before Christmas the “Inmate Rumor Mill” once again starts transmitting rumors that someone’s family has “verified’ that the DOC must release thousands of prisoners early to avoid overcrowded conditions, thus thousands of inmates are being evaluated for an early- Christmas kick-out.

    Although over the years state legislators have considered modifying the 85% requirement for those convicted of non-violent offenses, most notably during Governor Scott’s transition, there is no credible information that such will happen at least before the 2012 Florida Legislatures convenes in April of 2012. Why? Well, the primary reason is just that: the FDOC is NOT overcrowded at present, and the prisoner population is not projected to see any real growth for at least the next two years. How do I know this, you ask? Because the Legislature’s own research entity said so earlier this year.

    Among the Legislature’s arsenal of research capabilities is the lesser-known “Criminal Justice Estimating Conference” (CJEC), which among it varied duties, is primarily tasked with holding a conference every three months in order to consider the latest data about admissions and releases, the State’s crime rate, etc., in order to then issue a detailed projection to state officials of the current and future size of the prisoner population in the FDOC. The website for the CJEC is here, where you can find its most recent quarterly executive summary, updats, and other interesting data.

    According to the CJEC Executive Report issued in Februarym 2011, the FDOC population is expected to DECLINE over the next two years before increasing again:

    A review of the latest criminal justice system measures indicated that reported
    index crimes decreased by 4.8 percent in the first six months of 2010 compared
    to the same period in 2009. Felony filings declined by 3.5 percent and guilty
    dispositions decreased by 8.9 percent in 2010 over 2009. New commitments
    decreased by 5.9 percent in FY 2009-10 over the prior fiscal year.

    There were 704 fewer technical violators admitted to prison in FY 2009-10 than
    in the previous fiscal year. Year-and-a-day sentences declined in FY 2009-10 by
    1,177 from the FY 2008-09 level and the average sentence length for new
    commitments increased from 55.7 months in FY 2008-09 to 59.1 months in
    FY 2009-10.

    The conferees adopted a forecast which assumes a 6.2 percent decrease in total
    admissions in FY 10-11 and a 3.7 percent decrease in FY 11-12. Total
    admissions then increase gradually growing by 2.2 percent in FY 15-16.
    The projected prison population for June 30, 2011 is expected to remain virtually
    unchanged from the June 30, 2010 population, to decline slightly for two years
    and to grow gradually for the last three years of the forecast period. The new
    forecast is 718 lower than the October forecast at the end of FY 10-11 and 5,676
    lower at the end of FY 15-16.

    Criminal Justice Estimating Conference, Executive Report, February 21, 2012.

    Thus, as you can see for yourself, there is currently no projected increase in the FDOC prisoner population on the immediate horizon, and absent such, there is little (read: no) likelihood that state officials will do away with the 85% requirement simply because they have become sympathetic to prisoners and their families.

    However, with that said, it is extremely important to point out that prisoners and their families must not assume that because the population is not expected to increase over the next year or two, state leaders will not have any reason to change the 85% requirement. To be sure, the facts are quire the other way: now, more than ever, state officials are considering ways to reduce the record state budget, and that includes adopting policies that reduce the fiscal impact of the criminal justice and correctional systems. At roughly $20,000 a pop, keeping a non-violent prisoner in prison for 85% of their court- imposed system isn’t making a whole lot of fiscal sense to an increasing segment of the folks in Tallahassee, from the Governor’s office to the halls of the Legislature. In fact, I predict that during the 2012 Regular Session, we will see numerous bills filed that call for the modification of the 85% requirement for non-violent offenders. So it is vitally important that upon such a bill or bills being filed, prisoners’ families need to get busy with the letter writing campaign. One thing is certain – God willing, I will be right here leading the call to action.

 

 
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