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    Post Example Parole Letters

    THIS IS HOW I WOULD DO IT!
    Others please provide examples of how you would do it.

    Letters should be in the inmate’s hands one month before the hearing. The letters should be typed if at all possible. Use this as an example. Don’t copy it word for word. Write it in your own words. After the hearing send a Thank You note to each sender telling him/her the outcome. If it is no parole, ask that you can make a request for a new letter when the time comes.

    Each letter should

    be dated;
    should have the sender’s address/or phone number.
    have the inmate's full name and DOC number;

    Dear Sir or Madam:

    introduce the sender
    - who the sender is, example: how long at the same job or residence, type of work (show sender is a stable citizen)
    - how he/she knows the inmate
    - how long he/she has known the inmate

    recommend the inmate be paroled wit an explanation:
    - I recommend John Doe be paroled. I believe he has made mistakes in the past, however, I believe he will do his best to follow the law if released. He has told me of his work in the facility kitchen and the AA program he has participated in. I feel these experiences will help him to cope upon his release.

    Describe the support the sender can provide:
    - I can only provide moral support an encouragement.
    - I can provide rides to work and AA meetings.
    - I can provide a stable home for John Doe while he is on parole.

    Thank Parole Board
    - Thank you for reading my letter and considering John Doe for parole.
    - Your consideration in reading this letter is appreciated.
    - Please consider my comments in your decisions to parole John Doe.

    - Please feel free to contact me if I can be of any further assistance in this matter.

    Sincerely, or Thank you,

    Your name and Signature

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    Quote Originally Posted by P4J View Post
    THIS IS HOW I WOULD DO IT!
    Others please provide examples of how you would do it.

    Letters should be in the inmate’s hands one month before the hearing. The letters should be typed if at all possible. Use this as an example. Don’t copy it word for word. Write it in your own words. After the hearing send a Thank You note to each sender telling him/her the outcome. If it is no parole, ask that you can make a request for a new letter when the time comes.

    Each letter should

    be dated;
    should have the sender’s address/or phone number.
    have the inmate's full name and DOC number;

    Dear Sir or Madam:

    introduce the sender
    - who the sender is, example: how long at the same job or residence, type of work (show sender is a stable citizen)
    - how he/she knows the inmate
    - how long he/she has known the inmate

    recommend the inmate be paroled wit an explanation:
    - I recommend John Doe be paroled. I believe he has made mistakes in the past, however, I believe he will do his best to follow the law if released. He has told me of his work in the facility kitchen and the AA program he has participated in. I feel these experiences will help him to cope upon his release.

    Describe the support the sender can provide:
    - I can only provide moral support an encouragement.
    - I can provide rides to work and AA meetings.
    - I can provide a stable home for John Doe while he is on parole.

    Thank Parole Board
    - Thank you for reading my letter and considering John Doe for parole.
    - Your consideration in reading this letter is appreciated.
    - Please consider my comments in your decisions to parole John Doe.

    - Please feel free to contact me if I can be of any further assistance in this matter.

    Sincerely, or Thank you,

    Your name and Signature
    Wow, this is good! Thank you for caring enough to take the time to post this and all the things that you do. There are some good people in this world and you are one of them. Please, any other helpful things, think of me.
    DAVID

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    I agree thank you very much for posting this. That covered a little more than I did in my letter and it is good to know I can improve my letters!!

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    Default parole letters/parole plan????

    Hi everyone, well we have Parole letters for family's covered, but what about for the loved ones who are in? Any idea's or suggestions for them on their personal letters and parole plan for the Parole Board? Thanks for any suggestions and I hope everyone has a great weekend... Peace!

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    Exclamation Sample Inmate Self Support Letter to the Parole Board

    Sample Inmate Self Support Letter to the Parole Board


    If you have a friend or loved one who is incarcerated, they may have been advised that it would be helpful for them to write a letter of support to the parole board. While the following sample and guidelines should not be construed as legal advice, it might assist you in helping your friend or loved one know what to write in their letter to the parole board.

    Please be aware that each state might have different guidelines regarding what the parole board looks for in a support letter (a good rule of thumb is to contact the prison where your loved one is an inmate and ask them for any guidelines they might offer). You might also consider checking the prison's website.

    If you are seeking legal advice regarding parole, a prisoner's rights, or any other legal question regarding incarceration, please contact an attorney.

    Many parole boards want the inmate's self-support letter to be written in the inmate's own handwriting, rather than typed up by someone else on the inmate's behalf. The letter should include all of inmate's information including your name, identification number, and prison address.

    The next item in the inmate's self-support letter should be the date, which should be printed in the top left corner below the inmate's information. Next, the inmate should include the address of the parole board to whom he or she is writing.

    Following is a sample self-support letter.

    October 9, 2007

    John Q. Smith
    TDCJ#01234567
    13055 FM 3522
    Abilene, Texas 79601

    Honorable Members of the Parole Board
    Texas Board of Pardons and Parole
    Amarillo Board Office
    5809 S. Western, Suite 237
    Amarillo, TX 79110

    Dear Honorable Members of the Parole Board:

    I am writing this letter to you for your consideration in approving my parole. My parole eligibility date is June 19, 2008

    I have not had any new cases and I have not lost any work time or good time. I have signed up for all required treatment programs. I have also signed up for Changes and Cognitive Intervention classes. I feel this will help me become more aware of my actions. I know what I did was wrong and I have every intention of never breaking the law again. I take full responsibility for committing Burglary of a Habitation. I have mentally put myself in my victim's shoes, and I understand what damage has been done. I would never want that to happen to me.

    My goal when I get released is to gain employment as a welder at my father-in-law's business. I will also continue my education and study to receive an Associate's Degree in business.

    I will be living with my sister and brother-in-law who will be giving me the financial and emotional help and support that I will need until I get up on my feet. My family will be able to provide me with transportation as well.

    In conclusion, I am certain that with all I have learned from my incarceration and the support I have from my family and friends I will be able to make a positive transition back into the free world, never again to return to prison.

    Thank you very much for your time and consideration for this review for my parole.

    Sincerely,

    John Q. Smith
    TDCJ#01234567

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    Exclamation

    Date
    Full Name
    TDCJ #
    Address
    City, Texas Zip

    Honorable Members of The Parole Board
    Texas Board Of Pardons and Parole
    P. O. Box 13401
    Capital Station
    Austin, Texas 78711-3401

    Dear Honorable Members of The Parole Board,

    I am writing this support letter for your attention to my efforts towards rehabilitation in the hope of being accepted for parole. I have accumulated over 100 per cent of my time. I have not lost any good time or work time. I have completed all required regional treatment programs.
    I have learned in the intervention class through intensive study what brought me to the place I am now. I take full responsibility for the crime I committed of __________ that has brought me to this place. I am able to admit that I have a problem and I will never be able to ______________________. I believe that being incarcerated for this crime has saved my life. I know that I would not have been able to __________________ without help and the time spent in prison has been a positive experience which has given me the opportunity to learn the steps to take to never _______________. I have a greater awareness of ________ and I am prepared to do what ever it takes to continue with ___________ and succeed in my recovery.
    My goal on release from prison is to continue with my ______________and be the best husband, father and son to my family I can be. I want to be a law abiding, productive citizen and provide for my family in a way they deserve. I am very fortunate that I have a large family and friend support system in place. They all encouraged me to learn all I can about while here. They have told me that I can count on them to provide support when I need it after I am released from prison and return home.
    Prior to incarceration I had a successful business in ______________. I have transportation so getting to my job will not pose a problem.
    In conclusion, I know that with all I have learned from my incarceration and the support I have from my family and friends I will be able to make a positive transition back into the free world never to return again to prison. I thank you for your time and consideration for this review for my parole.

    Sincerely,
    Signature
    Full Name
    TDCJ#

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    Default Question about Parole Board Support Letters???

    I am prepared to write what I think is a very good support letter for my man. But I found so many samples on the web and I followed the guidlines to the "T", but I have a question in fact there are books to help too. My questions are: 1. Should the letter be lengthy? I found out that after I started writhing, I has so much to say. How long is too long? My letter was about shy of 31/2 pages long. Everything I said I could back it up and I gave examples to support my submission of support. 2. Should I ask others to write letters as well ie. family, friends who support him? and How many letters are appropriate? 3. How about clergy support letters and other community leaders and business owners support letters who are willing to write letters? (I just wrote the letter and saved it in my documents file but he won't be up for parole for a little while longer.)
    Last edited by msgg123; 08-22-2009 at 10:52 AM. Reason: missed spelled words

  8. #8
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    Exclamation Write a Letter to Help Your Loved One Receive Parole

    Write a Letter to Help Your Loved One Receive Parole

    Write a Letter to Help Your Loved One Receive Parole
    If you have a friend or loved one who is incarcerated, you may have been advised that it would be helpful for you to write a letter of support to the Parole Board on behalf of the inmate. And while you would like to be able to help in some way, you don't have a clue how to write a support letter to the Parole Board! The following sample and guidelines will help you write a letter on behalf of your loved one who is eligible for parole.

    Please be aware that each state might have different guidelines regarding what the Parole Board looks for in a support letter. A good rule of thumb is to contact the prison where your loved one is an inmate and ask them for any guidelines they might offer. Many prisons have this information available on their websites. Another important fact to be aware of is that this article in no manner is an attempt to offer legal advice. If you are seeking legal advice regarding parole, a prisoner's rights, or any other legal question regarding incarceration, seek advice from an attorney.

    As with any professional correspondence, your support letter should either be on letterhead (if you have Microsoft Word or another similar program you can easily create professional-looking letterhead from a template). The letterhead should include all of your contact information including your name, address, phone number(s) and email address if applicable.

    The next item in your support letter should be the date, which should be typed in the top left corner below your letterhead. Include an address block with the information of the inmate you are writing regarding. Next, include the address of the Parole Board to whom you are writing.

    If you know a specific name of someone on the prison's Parole Board, you may address them. Otherwise, begin your support letter with "Dear Honorable Members of the Parole Board" followed by a colon (. In your first paragraph, include your name, age, occupation (if you have been employed in the same field for some time, note that in your first paragraph) and relationship with the inmate.

    In your second paragraph, describe why you believe the inmate in your opinion deserves the chance for Parole. Tell about improvements the inmate has made since being incarcerated such as education and treatment programs. Discuss their positive attitude and feelings of responsibility and remorse.

    Finish your support letter by telling the Parole Board how you will support the inmate once they are granted Parole. Your support might be financial, such as a place to live, use of a vehicle, or help finding job offers. Your support of the paroled inmate can also be emotional such as accountability, advice and encouragement.

    Once you have completed your support letter, sign it and make copies. Send the original to the Parole Board that oversees the prison where your loved one is incarcerated. Send a copy to your loved one, and keep one to use in a Parole Packet.

    Here is a sample Parole Board support letter. Again, this is only an example and does not qualify as legal advice.

    PRINT ON PERSONAL LETTERHEAD

    Date

    In regards to: John Q. Inmate
    DOC#0123456789
    123 Jailhouse Lane
    Prison City, Any State 12345

    Honorable Members of the Parole Board
    Any State Board of Pardons and Parole
    555 Parole Board Avenue
    PB City, Any State 12345

    Dear Honorable Members of the Parole Board:

    My name is Sue Friendly. I am 34 years old and have been a Librarian for the Little City Library for 15 years. I am the sister of John Q. Inmate DOC#0123456789.

    Since being incarcerated, John has completed his G.E.D. and gone on to start college courses in Information Technology. He has graduated with honors from Behavioral Health courses, and always has a positive attitude when we visit or talk on the phone. He takes full responsibility for the actions that led to his incarceration, and shows considerable remorse.

    My husband and I are more than willing to provide John with every aspect of support, guidance, accountability and love. The job market in Little City is booming. My husband can offer him direct employment at the carrot canning factory upon John being granted parole. We also have an extra car that he can use until he has saved enough to purchase his own vehicle.

    I believe beyond a doubt that given the opportunity of parole, John will come home and make us all proud. Thank you for your time and attention.

    Sincerely,

    Susan B. Friendly

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    Quote Originally Posted by msgg123 View Post
    I am prepared to write what I think is a very good support letter for my man. But I found so many samples on the web and I followed the guidlines to the "T", but I have a question in fact there are books to help too. My questions are: 1. Should the letter be lengthy? I found out that after I started writhing, I has so much to say. How long is too long? My letter was about shy of 31/2 pages long. Everything I said I could back it up and I gave examples to support my submission of support. 2. Should I ask others to write letters as well ie. family, friends who support him? and How many letters are appropriate? 3. How about clergy support letters and other community leaders and business owners support letters who are willing to write letters? (I just wrote the letter and saved it in my documents file but he won't be up for parole for a little while longer.)
    I don't know how long is to long but as many letters as you can get the better it looks for them and helps, clergy support letters and other community leaders and business owners support letters who are willing to write letters are great!

    Just make sure the content of the letter has nothing to do with you defending what he was charged with they are looking from them admitting the crime and remorse.

    From you just that you are showing support and will help him out on the outside and maybe if you see a change in him for the better "That you feel rehabilitation has chaanged him or helped him".

    From others what kind of person they see him to be and that they would be willing to be there for support.

    Others from community leaders, if they knew him their views about him and how they feel about his release, that they are willing to accept him back into the community.
    Last edited by TexasDust; 08-22-2009 at 12:01 PM.

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    In regards to: John Q. Inmate
    DOC#0123456789
    123 Jailhouse Lane
    Prison City, Any State 12345

    Honorable Members of the Parole Board
    Any State Board of Pardons and Parole
    555 Parole Board Avenue
    PB City, Any State 12345

    is the first address, the address of the facility the inmate is at? and the 2nd where the parole hearing is held? do i need my address on the letter? where are hearings held in colorado? thank you!

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    I been doing some lookinv into this how to write the proper letter this info is very helpful even though we still have a lil while longer to go but thanks for the info.I also read somewhere where you state your name and address in the top righthand corner of your letter? I am not sure hoe accurate that is.

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    Bad news guys-new parole board rule. The victims can submit as many letters as they wish. The prisoners can only submit TWO. I woudl suggest the person to whom he is going to parole, referencing how many peeps would have been available to submit letters had they been able. Tell them all you are available to do to help...and of course, make it short. One more person can do the same. I think this is completely ridiculous and indicitive of the way things are going in the pro victim agenda.

 

 
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